Ashli Jewelers

January 29, 2010

The Hooded Falcon

The Falcon

The falcon or hawk signifies someone who is hot or eager in the pursuit of an object much desired. It is frequently found in the coats of arms of nobility from the time when the falcon played an important social role in the sport of kings and nobles. It is found as a heraldic bearing as early as the reign of King Edward II of England. The falcon was also the badge of one of King Henry VIII’s wives, Anne Boleyn, and was later adopted by her daughter Queen Elizabeth I.

The falcon is frequently found ‘belled,’ with bells on one or both of its legs.  It may also be ‘jessed and belled’ meaning that the jess, the leather thong that ties the bell to the leg, is shown with the ends flying loose; or it may be hooded, which is how falcons were carried on the wrist until flown. The falcon is indistinguishable, in heraldry, from the sparrow-hawk, goshawk, kite, or merlin, though they may be described that way in blazon. The falcon’s head is a common symbol on a crest; it can also be found, though, preying on something, which is termed trussing, rising or close.

Falconry

Falconry is a sport which involves the use of trained raptors (birds of prey) to hunt or pursue game for humans. There are two traditional terms used to describe a person involved in falconry: a falconer flies a falcon; an austringer flies a hawk (Accipiter and some buteonines and similar) or an eagle (Aquila or similar). In modern falconry the Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) and the Harris hawk are often used. The words “hawking” and “hawker” have become used so much to mean petty traveling traders, that the terms “falconer” and “falconry” now apply to all use of trained birds of prey to catch game.

Some views of falconry state that the art started in Mesopotamia, but some say that it started in the Far East. The earliest evidence comes from around the reign of Sargon II (722-705 BC). Falconry was probably introduced to Europe around AD 400, when the Huns and Alans invaded from the East. Frederick II of Hohenstaufen has been noted as one of the early European noblemen to take an interest in falconry. He is believed to have obtained firsthand knowledge of Arabic falconry during wars in the region (between June 1228–June 1229). He obtained a copy of Moamyn‘s manual on falconry and had it translated into Latin by Theodore of Antioch. Frederick II himself made corrections to the translation in 1241 resulting in De Scientia Venandi per Aves.

If you signify that someone who is hot or eager in the pursuit of an object much desired?  Then Ashli Jeweler presents the Hooded Falcon Statuesque just for you The Hooded Falcon consists of Leopard Skin Jasper, highlighted with gold plated silver parts are used to create this majestic masked falcon.  The stand is beautifully crafted with a combination of gold plated silver, wood ad Onyx.  The Hooded Falcon stands just under 10” tall while the stand is just under 6” tall.   Truly a collectors dream come true!

To order by phone or request additional information please call toll free 866.382.4907 x101 to speak with a customer service representative.  We will email an invoice for safe and secure payment by Google Checkout or Paypal.

Ashli Jewelers is a Luxury e-retailer who goal is to provide products with Extraordinary Creativity in Design with Exceptional Materials and Quality that are rare and extremely unique to the world’s most discerning Clientele.

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1 Comment »

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    Comment by cybermagnetik — May 23, 2011 @ 3:03 am


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